PARRIS ISLAND COINS » 1976 Half Dollar Value: Hhow Much Is It Worth Today?

1976 Half Dollar Value: Hhow Much Is It Worth Today?

1976 Half Dollar Value

The 1976 half dollar is a popular coin among collectors and holds a special place in the hearts of many Americans. It was minted to commemorate the bicentennial year of the United States, and features President John F. Kennedy on one side and an image of Independence Hall on the other.

While it may not have much intrinsic value, its collectible value can vary greatly depending on its condition and variety. In this blog post, we’ll explore the potential 1976 half dollar value depending on their grade – from “Good” to “Uncirculated” – and what makes these coins so special, so you can make sure your half dollar is getting its due respect!

We will also look at this fabulous coin’s rare error coins, which can be worth substantially more. And to top it off, we’ll answer your frequently asked questions about 1976 half dollars.

Are you ready to get started? Then let’s go!

1976 Half Dollar Value Chart

Mint Mark Good Fine Extremely Fine Uncirculated Proof
1976 “No Mint Mark” Half Dollar Value / / / $3.38 /
1976 “D” Half Dollar Value / / / $3.38 /
1976 “S” Half Dollar Value / / / / $4.63
1976 “S” Half Dollar Value – 40% Silver / / / $10.67 $15

Value by Mint Mark

Designed by Seth G. Huntington, the 1976 half dollar is a special coin. It has a weight of 11.34 grams, a diameter of 30.6 millimeters, and is composed of 91.67% copper and 8.33% nickel.

The obverse (front) of the coin features a portrait of President John F. Kennedy facing left with the words “In God We Trust” to the right of his portrait and “Liberty” above his head. Below him is the date, commemorating the nation’s 200th birthday, “1776-1976”.

The reverse (back) features an image of Independence Hall in Philadelphia with the words, “200 Years of Freedom” beside the building. Above the building are the words “United States of America” and below are the words, “Half Dollar”.

You will find the mint mark, if there is one, at the bottom center of the obverse, below President Kennedy.

The 1976 half dollar was minted at three different facilities, each with its own unique mint mark. The coins with no mint mark were produced at the Philadelphia Mint, and those with a “D” were made at the Denver Mint. Coins struck by the San Francisco Mint feature an “S” in their design.

The condition or grade of your 1976 half dollar will have a dramatic impact on its value. Collectors classify coins as either “Good”, “Fine”, “Extremely Fine”, or “Uncirculated”. Coins that are in “Uncirculated” condition are of course worth more than those that are in “Good” condition.

1976 No Mint Mark Half Dollar Value

1976 No Mint Mark Half Dollar Value
Credit: usacoinbook

With 234,308,000 of them minted, the coins that were produced at the Philadelphia Mint bear no mint mark. These coins are typically worth around fifty cents (or, face value) in “Good” condition. They are also worth face value in “Fine” condition and in “Extremely Fine” condition.

However, the value goes up when you get to “Uncirculated” examples. These “no mint mark” half dollars have a value of around $3.38 or more depending on their quality.

But you just never know what will happen, especially if your coin sells at an auction – one pristine “no mint mark” half dollar from 1976 sold not too long ago for a whopping $2,000!

1976 “D” Half Dollar Value

1976 “D” Half Dollar Value

The Denver Mint struck 287,565,248 1976 half dollars with a “D” mint mark, and these coins are usually worth the same as those from the Philadelphia Mint. This means that coins in “Good” condition can be worth around face value, as well as those in “Fine” condition and those in “Extremely Fine” condition.

In “Uncirculated” condition, these coins are generally priced at $3.38.

1976 “S” Half Dollar Value

1976 “S” Half Dollar Value

The “S” mark was used on all 7,059,099 of the San Francisco Mint struck coins. Because there are so few of these made, these 1976 half dollars generally have the highest value of all 1976 half dollar varieties mentioned so far.

These coins are the Proof coins, which means they have a slightly different design from the regular issue coins. The coins have a higher relief of the portrait of President Kennedy, and they have a frosted, mirror-like background. Produced only for collectors and not for business circulation, 1976 half dollar Proof coins can be worth approximately $4.63 or higher depending on their quality.

1976 “S” Half Dollar Value – 40% Silver Variety

1976 "S" Half Dollar Value - 40% Silver Variety

As a special bicentennial issue, the U.S. Mint also produced 40% silver Proof half dollars in 1976. With 11,000,000 of them created, they consist of 40% silver and 60% copper.

These Proof coins bear the same “S” mint mark as the regular Proofs and can be worth significantly more than their face value. If you are lucky to find one of these in “Uncirculated” condition, the 1976 half dollar Proofs have a value of around $10.67, and if you find them in mint Proof condition, they are worth $15 or more depending on their quality.

1976 Half Dollar Grading

The best way to grade a 1976 half dollar is to carefully examine the coin’s design and look for any signs of wear or damage, such as nicks, scratches, and other blemishes. Coins in “Good” condition will have some detail left in the design but lots of wear, while those that are in “Fine” or “Extremely Fine” condition should be even more intact, though still missing some detail in the high areas.

For coins that are “Uncirculated”, look out for any evidence of contact with other coins or surfaces which may have caused wear and tear on the design – there shouldn’t be any or at least very little. You can also use a magnifying glass to look for signs of cleaning or mishandling which may reduce its value. Additionally, if you have access to a coin grading service such as PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service), they can provide an independent and reliable assessment of your coin’s condition.

When it comes to collecting 1976 half dollars, certain varieties may be more valuable than others. Examples include Proof versions (struck with extra care) and error coins (with accidental changes made during production). It is important to research these varieties thoroughly before investing to ensure you understand their potential worth.

Rare 1976 Half Dollar Error Coin List

For the ultimate 1976 half dollar collector, there is a list of extremely rare errors that are known to exist in circulation. These coins have mistakes made during production and can be worth hundreds or even thousands of dollars depending on the type and condition.

Let’s look at a few of the most notable ones that have been known to appear:

1976 “D” Half Dollar – First Strike Full Brockage Error

The first interesting error we bring to you is one with a first strike full brockage error. This error occurs when a coin is struck within another coin, creating a mirror image of the design on both sides.

Since this 1976 “D” half dollar was a first strike full brockage error, it was created in the very first strike and that the entire design appears mirrored on each side of the coin. In other words, there is no Independence Hall on this reverse – only Kennedy’s reflected profile facing right instead of left.

Not surprisingly, it sold for over $4,400 at auction a few years ago.

1976 “S” Silver Half Dollar – Reverse Lamination Error

1976 "S" Silver Half Dollar - Reverse Lamination Error
Credit: coins.ha

This next error coin is a 1976 “S” silver half dollar with a reverse lamination error. This type of error occurs when a piece of the planchet breaks off during striking.

In this case, part of the silver layer of the reverse design (Independence Hall) is torn away from the copper center of the coin – something that happened with the surface during striking.

While most errors aren’t worth as much as this one, it still sold for over $490 at auction due to its rarity and condition.

1976 “D” Half Dollar – Major Curved 20% Clip Error

The last unique error coin in this list is a 1976 “D” half dollar with a major curved 20% clip error. This type of error occurs when a piece of the planchet is clipped away during production by accident.

In this case, approximately 20% of the coin was missing from the side of the coin due to a large curved clip – however, President Kennedy’s profile was astonishingly (and just barely) intact. Because of its unique error, it sold for over $230 at auction and only weighed 8.99 grams.

1976 Half Dollar – Broadstruck Out of Collar Error

1976 Half Dollar - Broadstruck Out of Collar Error

Another error from this list is a 1976 half dollar broadstruck out of collar. This type of error occurs when a coin is struck outside the collar that contains it during production. As a result, the diameter of the coin will be larger than normal and the edge will be somewhat flattened.

This particular example sold for over $120 at auction.

1976 “D” Half Dollar – Obverse Missing Clad Layer Error

1976 "D" Half Dollar - Obverse Missing Clad Layer Error
Credit: greatcollections

This 1976 “D” half dollar is unique in that it has an obverse missing clad layer error. This type of error means that the coin is missing the outer layer of the coin – in this case, the half dollar is missing its outer nickel layer on the obverse side. This gives the “front” side a copper color and the “back” side a nickel color.

This coin sold for $250!

1976 Half Dollar – Die Adjustment Strike Error

Finally, the last major error coin in this list is a 1976 half dollar with a die adjustment strike error. This type of error happens when the die used to strike the coins is not properly aligned and as a result, there is fading out of some or all of the design elements on the surface (on one or both sides).

This particular example had nearly all of the features missing besides the outline of President Kennedy’s profile and the outline of Independence Hall with its tall steeple, and it was graded at a mint state 60. It ended up selling at an auction for over $200, which is just amazing.

1976 Half Dollar FAQs

Now that you have a better understanding of 1976 half dollar value, here are some frequently asked questions that may help to answer any remaining queries:

What is the Value of a 1976 Kennedy Half Dollar?

The value of a 1976 Kennedy half dollar depends on its condition, type, and any errors that may be present. In general, the most common types are worth around $4-$5 in “Uncirculated” condition and up to $10-$15 for the silver Proof coins in pristine condition. Errors can range from hundreds to thousands of dollars depending on their rarity and quality.

Are 1976 Half Dollars Rare?

Not necessarily, but there are a few varieties and errors that can make them particularly valuable. For instance, a “first strike full brockage” error coin sold for over $4,400 at auction, so you just never know what you will find.

Are There Any Special Varieties of the Coin I Should Look Out For?

Yes, certain varieties such as the Proofs (especially silver) will be more valuable than others. It is important to research these thoroughly before making an investment in order to understand their potential worth.

Should I Clean My 1976 Half Dollar?

No, we do not recommend cleaning your 1976 half dollar as this can reduce their value significantly. It is important to keep them in their original condition in order to preserve their worth.

Where Can I Get More Information about 1976 Half Dollar Collectibles?

For more information on 1976 half dollar value and grading guidelines, visit the Professional Coin Grading Service website.

Conclusion

So there you have it – a breakdown of everything you needed to know about the 1976 half dollar. These coins are an iconic piece of American history and are a great addition to any coin collection, as they can be an interesting study in the history of American currency. With so many different varieties available and potential errors to look out for, there is something for everyone, so be sure to do your research before investing in any of these coins.

With the right knowledge, you can find some amazing pieces that will be worth a great deal! Good luck in your search!

Have you ever considered adding a 1976 Kennedy half dollar to your coin collection? Tell us your thoughts about it in the comments section below!

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